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Old 15-03-2019, 08:11 PM
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Thumbs up Bob with the show tractors, Malvern Tractor Show







Here is Bob with the show tractors, wishing he was back on the farm



The International Harvester Company (abbreviated first IHC and later IH) was a United States manufacturer of agricultural machinery, construction equipment, trucks, automobiles, and household and commercial products. Its reorganized successor, after spin-off of several of those businesses, is Navistar International.

In 1902, J.P. Morgan merged the McCormick Harvesting Machine Company and Deering Harvester Company, along with three smaller agricultural equipment firms, to form International Harvester. In 1985, International Harvester sold off most of its agricultural division to Tenneco, Inc., which merged it into its subsidiary J.I. Case under the Case IH brand. Following the terms of IH's agreement with Tenneco, the remainder of International Harvester (primarily heavy trucks) became Navistar International Corporation in 1986.








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Old 15-03-2019, 09:49 PM
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Old 15-03-2019, 10:24 PM
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David Brown

Founded in 1860 as a pattern manufacturing company by 1873 David Brown had begun to concentrate on gear systems and by 1898 was specialising in machine-cut gears.

The company moved in 1902 to Park Works at Huddersfield, where the firm is based today.
David Brown & Sons, Huddersfield (the Huddersfield group)

When David Brown died in 1903, his sons Percy and Frank took over and began the manufacture of gears, complete gear units, gear cutting machines, tools and equipment, bearings and shafts and worm drive gears. It's foundry makes steel and non-ferrous castings. Including motor vehicles, aircraft, ships as well as a wide range of British industry.

In 1951 the Huddersfield and Tractor groups freehold land and buildings at Huddersfield, Penistone and Meltham were on sites covering about 150 acres. Another 260,000 square feet of floor space were held under lease.

Gearing manufactured by David Brown Ltd. and powered by electric motors manufactured by Brook Crompton (Electric) Motors, whose factory was in Brockholes are used to rotate the top of the BT Tower in London.

From 1908 to 1915 David Brown and Sons designed and developed and made the Valveless car under engineer Frederick Tasker Burgess (1879-1929) later chief engineer at Humber and later still one of the team that developed the first 3-litre Bentley engine.

In 1913 they established a joint venture in America with Timken for Radicon worm drive units. By the end of World War I the workforce had increased from 200 to 1000 as they started building propulsion units for warships, and drive mechanisms for armaments. By 1921 the company was the largest worm gear manufacturer in the world.

In 1930 the company took over P.R. Jackson Ltd, another local firm of gear manufacturers and steel founders. Percy's eldest son (Sir David Brown) became managing director in 1931 following Percy's death in June that year. W S Roe was appointed joint managing director with David but he died in April 1933. Percy was appointed chairman. The firm formed another overseas joint venture with Richardson Gears (Pty) Ltd of Footscray, Victoria, Australia in 1934. In 1934 the company moved into an old Silk Mill on a site at Meltham, on the south side of Huddersfield. Brown started building tractors with Harry Ferguson there in 1936.

The company obtained a patent for a tank transmission using controlled differential steering system, known as the Merritt-Brown system, devised by Dr. H. E. Merritt, Director of Tank Design at Woolwich Arsenal, in 1935. The first vehicle to use this system was the Churchill tank, and it was subsequently used on the Centurion tank and the Conqueror tank, as well as the Tortoise heavy tank.
David Brown Tractors Group
David Brown Tractor Factory Meltham Mills 1981

Personally controlled since its inception by David Brown (1904–1993) the first venture into tractor production was in a joint project with Harry Ferguson in 1936 building the Ferguson-Brown tractor. David Brown became one of the biggest British tractor manufactures in the post war period, with a major manufacturing plant at Meltham, West Yorkshire England. The company broke new ground which others were only to follow later, but being a pioneering company ultimately led to it's downfall. The Ferguson-Brown had many innovative features, including the use of cast alloy for many the components, which was light but prone to damage. The Ferguson-Brown used a Coventry Climax engine for the first 350 tractors. Browns developed their own engine which was fitted to subsequent production. Total production was 1350 + 1 built from parts in 1940 after production finished.
1971 David Brown 990 tractor

Brown and Ferguson disagreed over tractor design details in the late 30s, which led David Brown to design his own version, the VAK1, in secret. This was launched at the 1939 Royal Show. Ferguson split away from Brown and joined up with Henry Ford in 1938, after a 'handshake' agreement, to allow his 'Ferguson System' three-point linkage to be used on the Fordson N tractors. That agreement was eventually terminated by Ford's grandson in 1947 and Ferguson again split away to form Ferguson Tractors in 1948.

During the Second World War Brown's new heavier tractor, the VAK1, was produced, with over 7,700 units eventually sold, making Brown a wealthy man. It is said the David Brown Tractor is the only one to be built onto a sturdy cast iron chassis where other makers bolt components together to form a chassis-less construction which is weaker, Brown also built aircraft tugs (VIG) for the Royal Air Force and for pulling the bomb trolleys used to re-arm aircraft. These tugs are distinctive, with truck like tyres, wrap round body work and HD bumpers front and rear, some being fitted with winches. In 1942 Brown started building a tracklayer version, the DB4. The DB4 was built for the army engineers and solved some of the problems found with the VTK, and got round an embargo on imported machines for military use. It was powered by a 38 h.p. Dorman diesel and a five speed gearbox. The DB4 was replaced in 1950 by the Trackmaster 30.










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Old 15-03-2019, 10:26 PM
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After the end of World War I, the Renault company used it's experience in armored tanks to devise agricultural vehicles. The Renault's Department 14 (responsible for the FT tank) developed the first tractor of the company, the Type GP, which was powered by an engine similar to that of the FT (a four-cylinder) and had tracks. The most distinguishable differences of the new tractor with the FT were the front-engine design and the reduced weight. The tractors were assembled in Renault's Billancourt factory since 11 November 1918 on the same production lines that the tanks and tested at Louis Renault's farm in Herqueville. The Type HO introduced in 1921 replaced the tracks by more conventional wheels. In 1926, Renault introduced the Type PE which was extensively revised compared to it's predecessors, incorporating a new engine with reduced consumes and a vertical radiator. In 1931, with the PE1, the radiator was moved from the middle position used in the previous models to the front and, in 1933, the model became the first France-produced rubber-wheeled tractor. The company also started to develop versions for specific markets, as vineyards. With the aim of reducing the fuel costs, it introduced it's first diesel-engined model, the Type VI, in 1932. By 1938, Renault was producing about 40 tractors per month and was the largest French manufacturer.

In 1920, Renault founded the Le Mans engineering centre. Shortly after, plans to move the agricultural machinery production to the new site were revealed. However, the new factory was inaugurated in 1940 and the production was stopped because of World War II. Following the war and nationalisation, the Le Mans plant resumed production. The location was divided into a foundry section, a mechanical parts section. (supplying the factories of Flins and Billancourt), a painting section and a tractor manufacturing section. At the time, Le Mans was the third largest Renault's operation in France after Billancourt and Cléon. The following years saw the arrival of the D, N, E and Super model series. In 1956, Renault Agriculture standardised the orange colour for its models. In 1950, Renault was the largest tractor manufacturer within France, producing 8,549 units, the 58% of the country's total production. In 1961, Renault introduced the 385 model, with a 12-gear transmission. Apart from its own engines, Renault used MWM and Perkins units. In the 1960s, it produced the One-Sixty Diesel for Allis-Chalmers. In 1968, the company introduced it's first four-wheel drive model. In 1972, Renault partnered with Carraro and sold some models of that company with the Renault badge.During the 1970s and 1980s, it also sold models from Mitsubishi. At the 1981 SIMA exhibition Renault Agriculture unveiled the TX range, with comfort elements designed in collaboration with the Renault's car division. The last Renault tractors had ancient gods' names.

From late 1993 to 1998, Renault Agriculture and John Deere had a partnership agreement by which the former received John Deere engines manufactured at the Saran factory and in return it supplied John Deere with tractors marketed as the 3000 series. In 1994, Renault Agriculture and Massey Ferguson formed a strategic partnership, as part of which they set up an equally owned joint venture called Groupement International de Mécanique Agricole (GIMA) at a facility located next to Massey's Beauvais factory with the aim of manufacturing transaxles and related components. In 1995, Renault Agriculture agreed to market products from the British agricultural machinery manufacturer JCB through its dealership network in France. In 1997, the company took a 16.6% stake of Rovigo-based Agritalia, a manufacturer of orchard tractors for various clients.In 2000, it purchased a stake in the Indian manufacturer International Tractors (the owner of the Sonalika marque), forming a Sonalika-Renault joint venture. In 2003, as part of a plan to shed non-core assets, Renault sold a 51% majority stake in Renault Agriculture's tractor manufacturing plant to Claas. In 2006, Claas increased its ownership to 80% and in 2008 took full control and renamed it Claas Tractor. By 2005, the Renault marque was phased out and all the tractor models produced at Le Mans were badged as Claas.


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Old 15-03-2019, 10:26 PM
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Fordson was a brand name of tractors and trucks. It was used on a range of mass-produced general-purpose tractors manufactured by Henry Ford & Son Inc from 1917 to 1920, by Ford Motor Company (U.S.) and Ford Motor Company Ltd (U.K.) from 1920 to 1928, and by Ford Motor Company Ltd (U.K.) from 1929 to 1964. The latter (Ford of Britain) also later built trucks under the Fordson brand.

American engineer, inventor, and businessman Henry Ford built experimental tractors from automobile components during the early 20th century, and launched a prototype known as the Model B in August 1915. Further prototypes, with a dedicated tractor design, followed in 1916. With World War I raging in Europe, the first regular-production Henry Ford & Son tractors were exported to the U.K. in 1917 to expand British agriculture. In 1918, exports continued, the tractors began to be labeled as Fordsons, and U.S. domestic sales began. Sales boomed in 1918 and 1919.

Between 1917 and 1922, the Fordson was for tractors somewhat like the Ford Model T was for automobiles—it captured the public's imagination and widely popularized the machine, with a reliable design, a low price affordable for workers and farmers, a widespread dealership network, and a production capacity for large numbers. Just as the Model T helped the public to appreciate how soon cars and trucks might replace most horses in transport, the Fordson helped people to appreciate how soon tractors might replace most horses in farming (advancing the mechanisation of agriculture). As with cars, Ford never had the market to itself, but it dominated the market for a time (for cars, roughly 1910–1925; for tractors, roughly 1917–1925). Ford was the only automotive firm to sell cars, trucks and tractors simultaneously from 1917 to 1928.

For a decade between 1928 and 1939, Ford of the U.S. left the tractor business. During that decade, Ford of Britain continued to build Fordsons and to develop new variants, which it exported widely. In 1939 Ford of the U.S. reentered the tractor market with an all-new model, this time with the Ford brand. Ford of Britain continued to use the Fordson brand until 1964.

Fordson production took place in the U.S. (1917–1928); Cork, Ireland (1919–1923 and 1928–1933); and at Dagenham, Essex, England (1933–1964). Tens of thousands of Fordsons, most from the U.S. and some from Ireland, were exported to the Soviet Union from 1920 to 1927. Soviet Fordson clones were also built at Leningrad from 1924 and at Stalingrad from 1930.












Bob told me his Grandad had a Fordson Major new at the Bage like the one above, Bob did much work with it in leter years, no cab many hrs cold and wet.




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Old 15-03-2019, 10:27 PM
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Bob said later the Bage had a Fordson Dexter like above, it worked along side the Fordson Major, and later it was changed for a Ford 3000 with a cab and hand screen wiper.













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Old 15-03-2019, 10:27 PM
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County Tractors

When County tractors first went into production in 1948, the first machines to be built were track laying. It wasn’t until 1961 that the manufacture of the equal wheeled 4WD units started. The tractors were based on a Fordson Supermajor and badged the Super Four. The drive to the front wheels was via twin shafts which allowed the standard differential to work on all 4 wheels. In 1962 a 6 cylinder tractor was introduced and badged the Super Six, production continuing with a restyle to the bonnet and radiator grill in 1963 and then manufacture ceased in 1965. It used the Ford 590 engine and produced 95bhp. These first County tractors soon built a reputation for their unrivalled traction and stability, with many farmers buying them specifically for hillside work.
The second generation of County tractors were introduced in November 1964. The 4 cylinder model was given the 654 badge, which was replaced by the 754 (based on the Ford 5000) in May 1968. The 6 cylinder version introduced in March 1965 was the 954 which produced 95bhp using the Ford 2703E engine until the tractor was replaced by the uprated 1004. July 1967 saw the flagship 1124 introduced and developed 113bhp from the Ford 2714E engine. This engine had an unstressed block and so County had to fit their own sumps to give extra structural support to the engine. The last 1124’s rolled off the production line in July 1971 and were replaced by the 1164.

Latterly County produced the 974 which was based on the Ford 7610, the 1164, 1174 and 1184 which was launched in 1979. The 1184 was built around a TW10 at 120bhp from the Ford 401S engine and had a weight distribution of 3.5 tonnes on the front axle and 2 tonnes on the rear axle. The 1454 weighed 7 tonnes and produced 145bhp from the turbocharged version of the engine fitted to the 1184. In 1978 the 1454 was superseeded by the 1474 (based on the Ford 9700) which was given a longer wheelbase and 149bhp, before been uprated to 153bhp when the base unit was changed to the TW20.

The final model to be introduced by County was the 1884. The Ford 401S engine was turbocharged and intercooled to develop 188bhp. This tractor was a giant of the field and was used by the largest arable farms. Weighing in at 8 tonnes and costing nearly £30,000 in 1980 it was a huge machine, but only about 20 were ever built before County tractors ran into financial trouble.

On the down side, the tractors had a large turning circle and weak power steering. Added to this spare parts have become hard to find as the company is now out of business. One specialist parts provider is Jas P Wilson of Scotland.

Tractor Engineer’s Barth K150 Trencher, based on a County skid unit.

or… Alf’s County 1124 he converted to 6 wheel drive and made into a draining machine.

County also made unequal wheeled tractors. Production started in 1968 with the 4000 Four. Based on the Ford 4000 the front axle was driven by a single propshaft with this design. These tractors were built to offer customers better headland manouvrability, although the traction capabilities were not as good as the equal wheeled machines. Production continued with the 6600 Four, 7600 Four, 7700 Four, and the 7610 Four. County also made 4WD conversions of International and Leyland tractors, albeit in limited numbers. The 634 All Wheel Drive was based on the International 634 and about 50 were made between 1969 and 1972 – these tractors produced 63bhp.

County tractors have become very collectable and have now begun to rise in value, with some of the less common models commanding high prices when put up for auction. In October 2005 a short nose 1474 made £46,000, but this price was eclipsed by a 1987 1474TW Dual Power long nose which fetched £66,000. Only 7 of these long nose tractors are known to exist and that was reflected in the price.

Read Ron Swartz’s story of a County Super 4 working on his dairy farm.

If you have a story or some info about your tractor then just post it here. It could be your restoration, where the tractor spent it's working life, what work it did or anything else related to Couty tractors.

There are a number of different books and DVD’s available about County tractors. Stuart Gibbard has written and narrated several books/DVD’s about Countys, in particular his County: A Pictorial Review is Vintage Tractor Engineer’s favourite. It is a collection of 280 rare and mainly colour prototype and production photos of these tractors from 1929-1983.




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Old 15-03-2019, 10:27 PM
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The Doe Triple-D or Doe Dual Drive is a make of tractor produced by Ernest Doe & Sons in the 1950s and 1960s in Ulting Essex. It's two engines and 90-degree articulation made it one of the most unorthodox tractors ever built.

Development

During the 1950s farmers in the United Kingdom in need of high-power tractors had few options. Essex farmer George Pryor developed an ingenious solution to the problem by creating his own tractor. He did this by purchasing two Fordson tractors, removing the front wheels and axles and linking the two by means of a turntable which provided the steering action powered by hydraulic rams. This left him with a double-engined four-wheel—drive tractor capable of producing more power and outperforming any of the conventional tractors on the UK market at the time.
Commercial production

Local Fordson dealers Ernest Doe & Sons agreed to build an improved version, the first one was completed in 1958 and called the Doe Dual Power, later changed to Doe Dual Drive and abbreviated to Triple-D.
Doe Dual Drive 130 on show at the Codicote Steam and Country Show 2009

The first Doe Triple-D used two Fordson Power Major units producing 100 hp (70 kW), the later Triple-D 130 used two Ford 5000 tractors increasing the power output to over 130 hp (97 kW) and the Triple-D 150 was based on Ford Force 5000 tractors producing 150 hp (112 kW).

The vast majority of Triple-Ds were sold in the UK, but a number were exported to the United States and elsewhere.

Disadvantages

The main disadvantage with the Triple-D was the lack of suitable implements for such a powerful tractor, this meant that Ernest Doe & Sons also had to develop and build a range of implements to sell with the tractors.

Other disadvantages stemmed from the use of two engines, this made controlling the tractor more difficult because of the need for two gearboxes. There were two engines and gearboxes to maintain and repair and the probability of breakdowns was increased.

End of production

By the late 1960s several companies had developed single-engined tractors capable of producing over 100 hp (70 kW), this competition put the Doe out of production after over 300 had been built.
Legacy

The Triple-D often makes appearances at agricultural fairs such as the Epworth Festival of the Plough in Epworth, Lincolnshire and LeSueur, Minnesota Pioneer Power Days show where it is always a crowd favourite, popular due to its unorthodox build.

Triple-Ds are worth a great deal due to their relative rarity, even unrestored Does can demand extremely high prices at auction.

The Triple-D is also available in a 1:16 Scale model produced by Universal Hobbies




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Old 16-03-2019, 01:16 PM
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Old 16-03-2019, 01:17 PM
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The Waterloo Gasoline Engine Company was the first company to manufacture and sell gasoline powered farm tractors. Based in Waterloo, Iowa, the company was created by John Froelich and a group of Iowa businessmen in 1893, and was originally named the Waterloo Gasoline Traction Engine Company. In 1892, Froelich had invented the first practical gasoline-powered tractor, and the new company was given the opportunity to manufacture and sell the tractor Froelich designed. Unfortunately, the tractor was not successful commercially, and of the four tractors built by the company only two were purchased, and these were later returned to the company by unsatisfied customers. In 1895, the company was sold to John W. Miller and renamed the Waterloo Gasoline Engine Company. Miller decided to stop producing tractors and instead focus on building plain gasoline engines.

Following several years of research and development, the company once again began to manufacture tractors in 1911, but none would sell well until 1913, when twenty “Waterloo Boy” tractors were produced. In 1914 the company introduced the Model R Waterloo Boy. This tractor proved immensely popular, and over eight thousand were sold before the line was discontinued in 1923. The company also had great success with the Model N, which was introduced in late 1916. Despite the company's name, both the Model R and Model N burned kerosene for fuel.

By this time, several other companies had begun to build and sell tractors, but the Waterloo Boy was easily one of the most popular. In 1918, Deere & Company, a farm equipment company based in Moline, Illinois purchased the Waterloo Gasoline Engine Company for $2,100,000. Deere & Company had been anxious to enter the growing tractor market, but its own initial designs had proved unsuccessful. Executives at Deere & Company decided to purchase the Waterloo Gasoline Engine Co. because field tests indicated that the Waterloo Boy tractor had the best performance. After the sale was completed, the company became known as the John Deere Tractor Company, but tractors produced by the company continued to be sold under the Waterloo Boy name until 1923, when the John Deere Model D was introduced.




The Rock Island Plow Co. was founded in Rock Island, Illinois in the USA, in 1855 as Buford & Tate (former partner and friend of John Deere). In 1884 The company was reorginized into the Rock Island Plow Co. one of the largest implement companies of the day. Rock Island never produced steam engines or their own gas engine line, although in 1911, they started to market other company's gas engines under their own name. In 1914 Rock Island partnered with the Heider Manufacturing Co. of Carroll, Iowa, USA. After two years they bought Heider out, but continued using the name on the tractor line till the late 1920s.

The Heider Brothers had entered into the tractor business in 1911 with their Heider Model A, which was quickly replaced by the Heider Model B. In 1914 with a new model (the Heider Model C 10-20, later upped to 12-20) nearing release, the Heiders were looking for a partner to help expand. After the 1916 buyout by Rock Island, the Heider Company returned to their original wagon business until the 1980's when the company was sold out.

The Heider tractors had a Waukesha 4-cylinder engine and a friction clutch drive arrangement that offered 7 speeds forward and reverse. A motor cultivator in 1 & 2 row models and a smaller 9-16 version were also produced. From 1927 on a new range was built under the Rock Island name based on a standard transmission design and 4-cylinder Waukesha in the 15-25 range and a 4-cylinder Buda for the larger 18-36 F series. The new models had a superficial resemblance to International Harvester tractors of the same period. The F and FA 18-36 remained in production from 1927 until 1935, but the 15-25 range saw numerous revisions with the 1929-1932 model G-2 being the most popular tractor of the Rock Island line. Later 15-25 models retained the 15-25 rating but had substantially larger engines. In 1937 the J.I. Case Co. purchased the Rock Island Plow Co. after tractor production had effectively ceased.
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