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Old 14-02-2021, 06:29 PM
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Lightbulb Some of my valve collection

Here we will look at some of my valve collection, tell a bit we know about them. what they were used in and what you could get for one, up first is the popular, Mullard a name most of you will know, here is the EY86.

Mullard Limited was a British manufacturer of electronic components. The Mullard Radio Valve Co. Ltd. of Southfields, London, was founded in 1920 by Captain Stanley R. Mullard, who had previously designed thermionic valves for the Admiralty before becoming managing director of the Z Electric Lamp Co.[2] The company soon moved to Hammersmith, London and then in 1923 to Balham, London. The head office in later years was Mullard House at 1–19 Torrington Place, Bloomsbury, now part of University College London.

Partnership with Philips
In 1923, to meet the technical demands of the newly formed BBC, Mullard formed a partnership with the Dutch manufacturer Philips. The valves (vacuum tubes) produced in this period were named with the prefix PM, for Philips-Mullard, beginning with the PM3 and PM4 in 1926. Mullard finally sold all its shares to Philips in 1927. In 1928 the company introduced the first pentode valve to the British market.



The EY86 is a television EHT rectifier is rated in terms of peak inverse volts (PIV) and that is quoted at 22,000 Volts. If fed from a sine wave the anode voltage would be limited to just under 8,000 Volts, but driven from the positive peaks of the line output transformer the rectified voltage can be about 17,000 volts and pulse input was a design feature. This is sufficient for a medium sized black and white TV.
The EY86 on a B9A base was a development of the EY51 wire ended design. This exhibit is a later production version and is gettered. The original EY86 was not gettered.
The maximum reservoir capacitor for use with this valve is 0.002 F, normally the capacitance of the CRT itself is used as reservoir.
The anode is a cylinder closed at the top and firmly fixed to the top cap. The cathode assembly is not visible due to the presence of the shield. The latter helps to prevent radiation of harmonics from the spiky input waveform.
Mullard specify: pins 1, 4, 6, and 9 may be used for fitting an anti-corona shield. Pins 3 and 7 may only be connected to points in the heater circuit and must not be earthed.
Mullard was purchased by Philips in the 1920s but the Mullard name was retained. This is the first example we have seen of the Philips name on a UK manufactured valve.
The thin glass tube envelope is 19 mm in diameter, and excluding the B9A base pins, is 65 mm tall.
References: Data-sheet & 1040. Type EY86 was first introduced in 1956.

The price today in a box working is around 5-00
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Old 14-02-2021, 07:29 PM
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For the 6F13 the Mazda box contained the following description:
'An HF pentode for use in HF, IF, frequency changer or video output stages of television and other short wave receivers
The 6F13 was part of an expansion of valves designed for the emerging television market.
The thin glass tube envelope is 20 mm in diameter and, excluding the B8A base pins, is 51 mm tall.
References: Data-sheet & 1040. Type 6F13 was first introduced in 1948.

In box working can be up to 25-00.
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Old 14-02-2021, 08:51 PM
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The PCL84 is a television triode and output pentode mainly for use as a video output stage. Within the envelope the triode section is quite small, about 2.5 mm thick and the anode cavity area is 18 mm x 7 mm. The output pentode is 11 mm front to back with a similar anode box area.
The thin glass tube envelope is 20 mm in diameter and excluding the B9A base pins it is 59 mm tall.
References: Data-sheet & 1040

Around 5-00 to 6-00 in box working.
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